Author Topic: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends  (Read 79408 times)

Barbara

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #30 on: November 22, 2008, 07:57:11 PM »
Well!  If I had been mistreated so, I would have come back to haunt them too!   >:(

Thanks Stu.

Barbara
"Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." - Mark Twain

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #31 on: November 25, 2008, 10:45:37 AM »
The Legend of The Appin Dirk

In the years after the Jacobite uprising of 1745, the terrible reputation of the government troops or 'Redcoats' as they sought to finally put down once and for all the brave highland clans was spread throughout the North of Scotland. One story concerning a poor milkmaid and a wicked redcoat sergeant passed into highland folklore and became known as the story of the Appin Dirk.
It was June 1746, only a few months after the disastrous battle of Culloden, Government troops were still engaged in a frenzy of looting and burning as they carried out Cumberland's order of 'No Quarter' beyond what was expected of them. One such detachment was passing through Lochaber and Appin on their way to the barracks at Inveraray. On the way they had burned small cottages, casting highlanders from their homes for nothing more than their own wicked amusement.

On one particular evening, as the troops moved through the Strath of Appin they encountered a young woman milking her cow in a nearby field. Overcome by their own bloodlust and some even more base instincts besides the sergeant who commanded the detachment leapt over the small wall into the field and with no warning shot the cow dead. With the cow dead he then advanced on the young woman - his intentions almost certainly dishonourable.


The young woman fought off the wicked sergeant bravely and ran off towards the Appin shore however she was pursued by him. In a last desperate attempt to make good her escape she picked up a good sized stone from the shore and hurled it at the sergeant with all her might. Whether by great accuracy or sheer luck the stone struck the sergeant square on the forehead, stunning him and knocking him to the ground. Her good shot gave her the few precious seconds she needed to make it to the shore where she knew a small boat lay moored. As the other soldiers tried to pursue her she managed to quickly row out of range and off to a small island where she sheltered for some time.

The sergeant was less fortunate, the blow had been more serious than the soldiers had at first realised. He was taken to a nearby place where they could stop for the night but as the evening wore on his condition became worse - almost as if the stone itself had been cursed. During the night he died from his wound. The other soldiers decided to bury him in the nearby churchyard; the old churchyard of Airds and move on.

The hatred for the government troops in this corner of Scotland was so great that the local men felt appalled that such a beast should contaminate their churchyard. As soon as the detachment had gone they stole into the churchyard and dug up his body. They carried him down to the sea but were stopped on the way by the brother of the young woman who had been attacked. He pulled out a knife and tore the skin from the arm of the wicked sergeant. This he took away with him. The corpse was then, with no ceremony cast into the sea.

The milkmaid’s brother dried and cured the skin and used it to make a sheath for his dirk.

Legends of the 'Appin Dirk' spread around the area, becoming a symbol of the highlanders continued resistance to occupation. In 1870 the Rev. Alexander Stewart who was in the area was shown a dirk by a local man which he claimed was 'The Appin Dirk' He described the sheath as having a dark-brown colour, limp and soft in appearance, with no ornament except a small piece of brass at the point, and a thin edging of the same metal round the opening. Around the brass rim there was a small inscription. The initials D.M.C. and a date; 1747.

This gruesome relic has long since vanished but the inscription does bear some clue into its possible whereabouts:

According to the story the young woman's name is given as Julia MacColl, the 'M.C.' of the inscription would suggest that this was the case as MacColl was a common name in that area at the time. Some years after the last sighting of the dirk many MacColls immigrated to New Zealand, among them were a few 'Julias'. It is highly possible that the descendants of Julia MacColl of her brother held on to the dirk and that it now lies undiscovered in New Zealand.

Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Barbara

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #32 on: November 25, 2008, 10:39:59 PM »
This was a very interesting story Stu, thanks.

Barbara
"Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." - Mark Twain

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #33 on: December 01, 2008, 10:36:21 AM »
Boobrie
From Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters
 
The boobrie is a mythical giant water bird of Scottish Highlands folklore that is generally only encountered by sailors and passengers at sea.

Origin
The creature is believed to be the metamorphosize form of the each uisge and haunts lochs and salt wells.

Description/Morphology
The Boobrie is a large wading bird that resembles a crane with a slightly hooked beak and clawed webbed feet. It has black plumage, lightening to dark grey, with a bright red beak and legs. It has a distinctive cry that is more raucous than the peacock.

Behavior
These grotesque birds tend to prey on ships carrying livestock. The Boobrie’s hunting strategy usually consists of mimicking the call of a lamb or calf (or whatever animal the vessel is carrying). Should an adult animal then stray over to investigate, the Boobrie would grasp it in its horrid talons, drag it overboard and drown it. Obviously the human mariners would attempt to thwart the Boobrie’s bizarre rustling, however other Boobries may attempt to distract the sailors by assuming the form of horses and running across the surface of the water. Should the Boobrie be denied its quarry it is said to bellow like an angry bull.

Retrieved from "http://www.monstropedia.org/index.php?title=Boobrie"
 
Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #34 on: December 03, 2008, 06:09:29 AM »
I think there must have been some Thom blood is this fiesty lassie!

Jenny Geddes
Throughout history there are incidents that at the time may seem small or even insignificant, the action of a few individuals who would normally be considered mere spectators in the pageant of history. Some obvious incidents come to mind; The Boston Tea Party or the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand both give rise to a 'butterfly effect' theory of world events.
Edinburgh's very own 'madam butterfly' has become a legend in Scotland's history... the infamous Jenny Geddes.

Jenny Geddes (c. 1600 – c. 1660) was a fruit and veg seller who kept a stall outside the Tron Kirk. Not a person that you would imagine as a significant historical character, but on 23rd July 1637 Jenny Geddes was a catalyst that started one of the most infamous riots in Edinburgh's history.

Firstly some background:

The origins of the incident date back to the accession to the throne of King Charles I in 1625. Charles was not a popular monarch north of the border; in particular the rites used in his coronation angered the more puritan post reformation church in Scotland. The Anglican form of worship was very close to Roman Catholicism and it was seen by many as an attempt by King Charles to bring back Catholicism through the back door. His new archbishop of Canterbury William Laud was also very unpopular in Scotland, but undaunted by the rise of feeling against his reforms Charles and his archbishop assembled a commission whose remit was to produce a prayer book suitable for Scotland that would bring it much more into line with the Church of England. In 1637 a new Book of Common Prayer was printed in Edinburgh, and it was to be first used in St Giles' Cathedral on Sunday 23 July 1637.

The stage was set - enter Jenny Geddes

There had been some unrest up to the date of the service so it is arguable that many came into St Giles that day ready for a fight. Ms Geddes took her place, not on one of the pews but among the womenfolk who were required to bring their own stools into the cathedral and use one of the aisles. A very nervous James Hannay, Dean of Edinburgh began to read from the new prescribed service to the sound of unruly murmurings from the congregation.

Jenny geddes sat fuming on her "fald stool" or a "creepie-stool" meaning a folding stool. Finally she had heard enough and stood up and cried; "Deil colic the wame o’ ye, fause thief; daur ye say Mass in my lug?" meaning "Devil cause you severe pain and flatulent distension of your abdomen, false thief: dare you say the Mass in my ear?” And at that she hurled her stool straight at the Dean's head. This sparked a full scale riot in the church. one congregation member who had been heard uttering a response to the liturgy was thumped with bibles. The Dean took cover and the Provost summoned his men to put down the disturbance. The rioters were soon ejected from St Giles and the Bishop of Edinburgh appealed for calm. However this was not going to end quietly, The Presbyterians of 17th Century Scotland would have made the al-Qaida look moderate! Abuse reigned in from the street outside, windows were smashed and the doors looked to be broken down.

The riots continued on that day throughout Edinburgh, The City chambers were laid siege to with the provost now sheltering inside. Eventually they negotiated a 'truce' of sorts. At the suggestion of the Lord Advocate a committee was appointed known as the Tables to negotiate with the Privy Council. Their suggestion of a withdrawal of the offending liturgy was not surprisingly thrown out by King Charles.

This led to even more unrest including the signing of the National Covenant in February 1638. Later that year the bishops and archbishops were formally expelled from the Church of Scotland, which was then established on a full Presbyterian basis. Charles responded in his trademark arrogant manner by instigating the Bishops' Wars which ultimately led to the English Civil War and the execution of Charles and his Archbishop.

  In St Giles Cathedral a monument stands to this unlikely heroine. A bronze 3 legged stool (not the folding stool as described in many accounts) stands to commemorate that day a market trader pawn took the head of a king.

As an aside to the story, around 1787, Robert Burns named his mare after Jenny Geddes in tribute.

 

Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #35 on: December 05, 2008, 11:49:51 AM »
Christmas is coming!

YULETIDE CUSTOMS OF OLD SCOTLAND

Christmas & New Year were equally welcomed by Scots before the Reformation of the 16th-17th centuries. All the customs of both festivals stem from that time.

The name comes from the Scandinavians, for whom 'Yultid' was the festival celebrated at the twelfth month, being the twelfth name of Odin, who was supposed to come to earth in December, disguised in a hooded cloak. He would sit awhile at the firesides listening to the people, and where there was want he left a gift of bread or coins. (Strains of Father Christmas here!)

Christmas was often known as Nollaig Beag , Little Christmas. The custom was to celebrate the Birth of Christ with all solemnity, the festivities began a few days later, and spilled into New Year and Twelfth Night, which was known as 'Little Christmas'. However, the French often called Christmas colloquially, 'Homme est né' (Man is Born) which is thought by some scholars to be the origin of the word, 'Hogmanay', steaming from the time of the 'Auld Alliance'.

The Reformation hit Scotland as hard as everywhere else. By 1583, Bakers who made the Yulebreads were fined, their punishment could be lessened if they gave the names of their customers!

In 1638 the General Assembly in Edinburgh tried to abolish Yuletide.

While the same things were going on south of the border, with the Restoration of the Monarchy came the restoration of Christmas. In Scotland, the rigid laws of the new Kirk still frowned upon Christmas celebration, so it stayed underground. Only the High church and the Catholics kept the old traditions going.

In England many of the symbolisms and earlier religious elements were lost, and it took the intrepid Victorian historians to gather together the remnants and re-establish Christmas, an effort which was helped by the strongly Christmas orientated Royal family with its German Prince Consort. The Reformation in Germany had hardly touched Christmas at all, and Prince Albert brought it all to the public eye.

English custom was not particularly accepted by Scotland. The inherent need to celebrate came out in Scotland as a great revival of the New Year celebrations. In fact, hardly changed at all because Old Christmas comprised three days of solemn Tribune, church services, fasting and hard work. Church on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Followed by a day of Charity on the Feast of Stephen and which we now call Boxing Day. No-one would have thought much about parties and frolics until after these days were over. Then the solemnity gave way to joyous and often rowdy celebration and holiday under the name of 'Homme est né' or Hogmanay.

Being intended by the reformed church, as a day of prayer, the puritanical elements gradually closed in on all those who defied the new laws and continued their festivities. In England soldiers were chosen especially for their noses a long nose was thought to be able to sniff out the spices in the Christmas Baking better! In Scotland the Bakers were encouraged to inform on their customers. In their attempts to stamp out frivolity, they prescribed that Christmas would be a working day. So it became the custom to work over Christmas.

This prevailed throughout the whole of Britain, especially in the working classes. Until 40 years ago postmen, bakers, transport workers, and medical staff were commonly expected to work, but because of the Victorian revival of Christmas in England, many other establishments closed, while in Scotland shops and many offices stayed open.

However, this did not mean that people did not celebrate Christmas. Often they would go to Church before work, or at Lunchtime, or in the evening. They would have a Christmas Tree and a Christmas Dinner and children went to bed expecting that kindly old gentleman to call with a gift or two.

CUSTOMS & BELIEFS ASSOCIATED WITH SCOTTISH CHRISTMAS:

Black Bun. Originally Twelfth Night Cake. It is a very rich fruit cake, almost solid with fruit, almonds, spices and the ingredients are bound together with plenty of Whisky. The stiff mixture is put into a cake tin lined with a rich short pastry and baked.

This takes the place of the even more ancient Sun Cakes. A legacy from Scotland's close associations with Scandinavia. Sun cakes were baked with a hole in the centre and symmetrical lines around, representing the rays of the Sun. This pattern is now found on the modern Scottish Shortbread, and has been misidentified as convenient slices marked onto the shortbread!

Bees leave hives Xmas Morn. There is an old belief that early on Christmas Morning all bees will leave their hives, swarm, and then return. Many old Scots tell tales of having witnessed this happening, though no-one can explain why. One explanation is that bees get curious about their surroundings, and if there is unexpected activity they will want to check it out to see if there is any danger. As people were often up and about on Christmas night observing various traditions, or just returning from the night services, the bees would sense the disturbance and come out to see what was going on.

Divination customs - Ashes, Bull, Cailleach
There are a number of ancient divination customs associated with Scottish Christmas tradition. One involves checking the cold ashes the morning after the Christmas fire. A foot shape facing the door was said to be foretelling a death in the family, while a foot facing into the room meant a new arrival.

Another was the ceremonial burning of Old Winter, the Cailleach. A piece of wood was carved roughly to represent the face of an old woman, then named as the Spirit of Winter, the Cailleach. This was placed onto a good fire to burn away, and all the family gathered had to watch to the end. The burning symbolised the ending of all the bad luck and enmities etc of the old year, with a fresh start.

The Candlemas Bull was in reality a cloud. It was believed that a bull would cross the sky in the form of a cloud, early on the morning on Candlemas, February 2nd. From its appearance people would divine. An East travelling cloud foretold a good year, south meant a poor grain year, but if it faced to the west the year would be poor. This custom was a remnant of the ancient Mithraiac religion, when the Bull-god would come at the start of Spring to warn of the year the farmers could expect.

CANDLELIGHT
All of the Celtic countries have a similar custom of lighting a candle at Christmastime to light the way of a stranger.

In Scotland was the Oidche Choinnle, or Night of Candles. Candles were placed in every window to light the way for the Holy Family on Christmas Eve and First Footers on New Years Eve. Shopkeepers gave their customers Yule Candles as a symbol of goodwill wishing them a 'Fire to warm you by, and a light to guide you'.

FIRST FOOTERS
It was and still is the custom for a stranger to enter the house after midnight on New Years Eve/Day. There were taboos about the luck such a stranger would bring, especially in the days of hospitality to travelling strangers. A fair haired visitor was considered bad luck in most areas, partly due to the in-fighting between the dark scots and the fair Norse invaders. However, in Christian times, a fair haired man was considered very lucky providing his name was Andrew! Because St Andrew is the Patron Saint of Scotland. A woman is considered taboo still in many areas!

The Firstfooter must make an offering, a HANDSEL. This can be food, drink or fuel for the fire. The ritual which have grown up around this custom are many. An offering of food or drink must be accepted by sharing it with everyone present, including the visitor. Fuel, must be placed onto the fire by the visitor with the words 'A Good New Year to one and all and many may you see'. In todays often fireless society the fuel is usually presented as a polished piece of coal, or wood which can be preserved for the year as an ornament.

Sayings eg : Is blianach Nollaid gun sneachd - Christmas without snow is poor fare.

Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #36 on: December 12, 2008, 09:42:41 AM »
Something a bit more modern...

Common Riding is an annual event celebrated in Scottish Border towns, to commemorate the times of the past when local men risked their lives in order to protect their town and people.

The Hawick Common-Riding is the first of the Border festivals and celebrates the ancient custom of riding the boundaries of the parish/marches and the capture of an English Flag in 1514. The Common-Riding proper takes place in June on a Friday and Saturday.

The Cornet for the year is elected by the Provost's Council in May. From then until the festival is over the Cornet is an honoured figure in Hawick. The first recorded Cornet was in 1703 and other than the World Wars there has been an unbroken line to the present day.

In the weeks preceding the actual Common-Riding, on each Saturday and Tuesday, the Cornet and his supporters are out on their ride-outs in the course of which they visit surrounding villages and farms. The first of the Cornet's Chases takes place up a hill called the "Nipknowes" where a local caterer is asked to prepare the customary dish of “curds and cream” for refreshment during the actual riding of the marches. This marks the end of the preliminary procedure.

On the Sunday before the Common-Riding the Council attends the Kirkin' o' the Cornet, a church service. In the afternoon the Cornet's Lass with the Lasses of the two previous Cornets travel to the Hornshole Memorial and lay a wreath.

Following Chases on the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings the second major Chase takes place on the Thursday morning when the Cornet carries the Flag for the first time. The Principals visit the local schools where the Cornet asks that the children are given a holiday for the rest of the week. This is of granted and the children and parents join in singing festival songs.

The Colour Bussing, takes place on the Thursday evening in the Town Hall. The Provost and Magistrates are played into a packed Hall by the Drum and Fife Band. Then come the Lasses with the Maids of Honour. The Cornet's Lass carries the Flag to the front of the Hall with her attendants and “busses” the Flag by tying ribbons to the head of the staff. The Flag is given to the Cornet where he is reminding him that it is “the embodiment of all the traditions that are our glorious heritage”. The Cornet is charged to ride the marches of the commonty of Hawick and return the Flag “unsullied and unstained”. The Halberdier then calls on the burgesses to “ride the meiths and marches of the commonty”. Then begins the Cornet's Walk round the town with his supporters.

Early the following morning the Drum and Fife Band set off to rouse the town. At Towerdykeside a ceremony called the Snuffin' is performed, when snuff is dispensed from an old horned mull. Soon the crowd soon disperses to the surrounding pubs for the traditional rum and milk before breakfast, followed by the singing of the “Old Song” at the door of the Tower Hotel, each of the Principals taking it in turn to sing verses.

Following this the Principals, along with upward of 300 followers, mount their horses and process round the town and onto the Nipknowes where the main festival chase takes place concluding in song, toasts and the curds and cream. The riders then set off via Williestruther Loch and Acreknowe Reservoir to ride the marches where the Cornet ceremoniously “Cuts the Sod”. They then make their way to the race-course where, after a programme of horse-racing, the company remounts and proceeds to Millpath where a proclamation is made that the marches have been duly ridden, without interruption or molestation of any kind. This is then followed by more singing and playing of Drums and Fifes and the Flag is returned temporarily to the Council Chambers, where it is displayed. The assembled gathering then eat, sing and dance into the night before seeing in the dawn from the summit of Moat Hill.

On Saturday the town is again roused by the Drum and Fife Band and by 9.30 a.m. they ride to Wilton Lodge Park where the principals lay wreaths of remembrance on the town's War Memorial. The procession then heads for the Moor where horse races are again held.

On the Cornet's return, his official duties end when he ceremoniously returns the Flag to the Provost in the Council Chambers. In the evening there is the Greeting' Dinner - an informal occasion when the company bid farewell to the Left-Hand Man, who as Cornet of two years ago, is wearing his uniform for the last time. Afterwards the guests and principals make their customary tour of the fairground in the Haugh.

Teribus is traditionally sung at many occasions during the festivities.

In March 2007 The Rough Guide tourism book wrote that Hawick Common Riding was one of the best parties in the world. It praises the event, which "combines the thrills of Pamplona's Fiesta de San Fermin with the concentrated drinking of Munich's Oktoberfest".


Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Mary

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2008, 12:50:55 PM »
Quote
We have GOT to go to Scotland and DO this!!!
Something a bit more modern...

Common Riding is an annual event celebrated in Scottish Border towns, to commemorate the times of the past when local men risked their lives in order to protect their town and people.[/quote]

Thanks, Stu!  I want to go NOW!!!

Barbara

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2008, 10:08:08 PM »
Me too, I would like to participate in that festival!  Sounds like a lot of fun.  Like we all have when we get together at the Glasgow Games.  I encourage all who can, to come to the Glasgow, KY Games in the Spring, we do have a lot of fun. 

Thanks Stu for finding all this information and posting it for us.  :D

Barbara
"Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." - Mark Twain

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #39 on: December 16, 2008, 12:36:42 PM »
The Banshee

It is told that dogs can see the spirit messenger of death coming nigh in the darkness. When they catch sight of it they begin to howl. People who hear dogs howling at night fear that someone they know will meet with a fatal accident or die suddenly while asleep.

The Banshee is dreaded by dogs. She is a fairy woman who washes white sheets in a ford by night when someone near at hand is about to die. It is said she has the power to appear during day-time in the form of a black dog, or a raven, or a hoodie-crow.

The following is a Highland poem about the Banshee, who is supposed to sing a mournful song while she washes the death-clothes of one who is doomed to meet with a sudden and unexpected death:--

Knee-deep she waded in the pool--
  The Banshee robed in green--
Singing her song the whole night long,
  She washed the linen clean;
The linen that must wrap the dead
  She beetled on a stone;
She washed with dripping hands, blood-red,
  Low singing all alone:

The Banshee I with second sight,
Singing in the cold starlight;
I wash the death-clothes pure and while,
For Fergus More must die to-night.


’Twas Fergus More rode o'er the hill,
  Come back from foreign wars;
His horse's feet were clattering sweet
  Below the pitiless stars;
And in his heart he would repeat:
  "O never again I'll roam;
All weary is the going forth,
  But sweet the coming home."

The Banshee I with second sight,
Singing in the cold starlight;
I wash the death-clothes pure and while,
For Fergus More must die to-night.

He saw the blaze upon his heart
  Bright-gleaming down the glen;
O, he was fain for home again!--
  He'd parted with his men.
"’Tis many a weary day," he'd sigh,
  "Since I did leave her side;
I'll never more leave Scotland's shore
  And Una Ban, my bride."

The Banshee I with second sight,
Singing in the cold starlight;
I wash the death-clothes pure and while,
For Fergus More must die to-night.


With thought of Una's tender love
  Soft tears his eyes did blind,
When up there crept and swiftly leapt
  A man who stabbed behind.
"’Tis you," he cried, "who stole my bride.
  This night shall be your last." . . .
As Fergus fell, the warm, red tide
  Of life came ebbing fast.

The Banshee I with second sight,
Singing in the cold starlight;
I wash the death-clothes pure and while,
For Fergus More must die to-night.


Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Mary

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2008, 12:42:02 PM »
UGHHHHHHHH.............. if the dog runs off howling, I'd try a big stick on that Banshee!  >:(

Barbara

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #41 on: December 21, 2008, 10:17:17 PM »
I'll help you Mary!  :o

Barbara
"Kindness is the language the deaf can hear and the blind can see." - Mark Twain

arlin payne

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #42 on: December 24, 2008, 03:51:06 PM »
Since this is the general scottish category and the thread is customs and
traditions, Here goes.
I would like to wish all the Scottish Generals, every one here and the Thompson family world wide a MERRY CHRISTMAS and a Happy New Year..
See all of you next year.

Arlin ;D ;D ;D

Stirling Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #43 on: January 08, 2009, 09:59:31 AM »
FINNAN HADDIE
Let's try and catch a couple of fish on the same hook here! This item is traditional Scottish, a recipe, and something with which I am personally aquainted from early childhood on the coast of Maine. Back when I was a kid, my dad worked as a fisherman so fish was a frequent menu item at my house come suppertime and one of my favorites was finnan haddie. It used to be much more common in the grocery store back then than what it is today probably because fresh fish is more readily available now so the requirement for a longer shipping life is gone. The recipe is simple:
   In a baking dish place the finnan haddie and add milk to about half the thickness of the fish.
   Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
   Serve with lots of butter.

from the web...

For many Americans, finnan haddie recipes might sound like something exotic. But many of us have eaten this type of food under its more common name—smoked haddock.

Origins of Finnan Haddie Recipes
This white fish became popular in the coastal town of Findon, Scotland. Also known as Finnan, the catch was so well-known in the area that it soon took on the local name. In its original form, finnan haddie recipes were simple and primitive meals. Fisherman simply cleaned and split the fish, then smoked it right on the beach over a peat fire. Most chefs do more with the fish now, of course.

A Breakfast Fish?
In Scotland and other parts of Europe, finnan haddie recipes are a breakfast staple. Served alongside oatmeal, pancakes, and toast, it provides a hearty breakfast that that fills you up without the high calories and cholesterol that comes with other traditional breakfast staples. The grilled and poached versions of this fish are much healthier than bacon and eggs.

Europeans, in fact, rarely eat finnan haddie for anything other than breakfast. Serving it alongside mashed potatoes or with a white sauce is more common in New England and other parts of the United States.

Some people complain about the saltiness of the fish, but this is easy enough to fix. Simply simmer it gently in water before cooking it and discard the water. Much of the salt will be pulled from the fish, leaving you with just the haddock flavor. .

Retrieved from "http://recipes.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Category:Finnan_Haddie_Recipes"

Semper Fidelis! Semper Familia!
Stu

Ernest Thompson

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Re: Customs and Traditions, Myths and Legends
« Reply #44 on: January 08, 2009, 08:16:13 PM »
In Australia it was known as Scotch Haddock and was served mainly as an evening meal with mashed potato and white sauce.
Not as common today as there are too many frozen fish delicacies available.

Ern