Author Topic: A clan kilt  (Read 32401 times)

A. Thompson

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A clan kilt
« on: September 30, 2008, 12:14:15 PM »
Hi, just wondering.  Is there any suggestions for places can get a Thom(p)son kilt?  I only have blackwatch at moment, but would like to show the thom(p)son colors when can save up enough for a kilt.  Also is there any other way I can show my membership in clan.

Barbara

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 09:08:36 PM »
Ask Mary, she can tell you how to get a kilt.  We are so new that we don't have membership cards or certificates yet but I'm sure we will get around to all that soon.

By the way, welcome!  :D

Barbara
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Duke Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2008, 07:08:24 PM »
Hi Aiden,

There are many Thom(p)son Tartans, a quick google image search will show you many pictures.  In the U.S. you will often see grey and camel in fashion items if you look for them and also scarves, but the Thom(p)son blue, red, and hunting are also rather common.  There are more and there are variations in the colors and the weight of the wool (often 11 oz for kilts) can make a difference in appearance as well.  You may also see notations of Modern, Ancient and Muted which gives color variations as mentioned below.

I just ordered a kilt from Alexis Malcolm http://www.alexismalcolmkilts.com in south Florida and she is wonderful.  I have been speaking with her and corresponding for some time.  She helped me research the tartans and weights available currently from different mills and gave me a pretty good education on tartan and kilt nuances, see below.  She found a 13 ounce Thompson Hunting Muted for me that was exactly what I wanted.  It actually has the dark greens, browns, and blues and none of the turquoise color you see in the Thompson Hunting Ancient.

From Alexis Malcolm
You probably know this but the designations of  Modern, Ancient or Muted only replicate the ways in which the old berry dyes of a single tartan used to fade or weather. "Modern" designates the way the tartan would appear when freshly woven ( dark, rich olors).  "Ancient" is the appearance of the tartan after the rapid fading of the original color or a lighter/faded look, ie; Dark Navy blue to a powder blue, dark forrest green to a turquoise & dark rich red to a more orangy red. The "Muted" or "Weathered" designations replicate the sun's weathering out of the original colors (a more "brownish" effect), but whether it's Modern, Ancient or Muted, it all still the same Thompson Hunting tartan. There is one small mill that weaves the Thompson/Thomson Hunting in the Modern colors, but only in the feather weight, 8oz. This weight is only suitable for scarves & light weight curtains.  There is another mill that weaves it in the heavier 13oz. weight in the Thompson Hunting Muted colors

James Edward Thompson, Jr. aka Duke
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A. Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2008, 08:59:21 PM »
Cool.  Thanks.  And yeh more looking for Thompson Blue in the 5 yard  (more economically feasible)

Had found some sites, but they were mostly oversea and the american dollar isn't worth crap lol  and shipping costs unknown.

Michael Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2008, 09:56:00 PM »
The Thompson Blue is the standard Thompson tartan. There are variations that some people prefer, such as grey or camel. There is a standard explanation out there that the "ancient" or lighter colored  tartans are more muted because of the vegetable dyes, but that's pretty much an invention of the companies who make the cloth. Even the whole idea of clan tartans is a fairly modern invention. But the idea of a common tartan for all members is still a cool one, and you'd be surprised how easy it becomes to recognize your own clan at a distance by the tartan.

The weight makes more difference in a kilt, and the number of yards. 11 oz. is pretty lightweight, and won't swing as well as heavier weight cloth. 13 oz. is better. Worsted is the best. 4 yards is a casual kilt, a full kilt has at least 8 yards, more if you're large. That's where the expression "the full nine yards" comes from.

A good kilt is made by a kiltmaker, not by a seamstress. tehy may be able to sew brilliantly, but there are issues with making a kilt that only a kiltmaker understands. The pleats must be lined up a certain way in the back, one way for military, another for most civilian methods, but lined up nonetheless. A good kilt is hand sewn, never by machine. Find a kiltmaker who knows these things and you've got somebody who can do a good job for you.

You can buy an off-the-rack kilt for as low as a hundred bucks US, but real quality kilts start at $400 and go up from there. Six or eight hundred is not unusual for a really good quality kilt.

My random thoughts. Hope they help.

Michael
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MACTAVISH

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2008, 10:56:00 PM »
I HAVE SEVERAL KILTS,ISSUED AND NON ISSUED. I HAVE MY REGIMENTAL KILTS.COLOQUIALLY CALLED 'BLACK WATCH' BUT CORRECTLY CALLED 'GOVERNMENT No.1' . I HAVE THE MACTAVISH ANCIENT/THE  MODERN/ THE MACTAVISH OF GARTHBEG(WHICH IS DARK GREEN AND ERGO I CALL MY 'HUNTING' TARTAN) I ALSO HAVE A NEW ONE CALLED'HIGHLANDER' WHICH I WEAR TO ESTABLISH MY UNIQUE ROOTS TO MY PEERS. EACH KILT COSTS AROUND $600-$700.BUT IVE HAD SOME FOR 20 YEARS + AND DONT FORGET; I DONT WEAR TROOSERS UNLESS DPMs (FATIGUES).
 APART FROM SPECIAL OCCASSIONS FEW SCOT IN THE CITYS WEAR THE KILT. THATS WHY I LIKE ARGYLL, KILTS ARE COMMON WEAR. ITS NICE TO IDENTIFY BY TARTAN TOO- AS MICHAEL SAYS. IF I WALK THROUGH OBAN AND PASS A KILTIE I SAY' GUID MORNIN' MR MACDONALD' OR WHATEVER IN ENGLISH OR GAELIC.
IN DUNOON THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL WEAR THE KILT AS UNIFORM. I ACTUALLY WENT TO SCHOOL IN THE KILT APART FROM WHEN DA WAS POSTED OVERSEAS WHERE IT WAS CONSIDERED A BAD IDEA IN PLACES LIKE MINDEN DUE TO NOT WEARING UNDERWEAR.

MACTAVISH

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2008, 11:00:39 PM »
I CANNOT STRESS ENOUGH THE IMPORTANCE OF NOT WEARING UNDERWEAR.ITS TABOO.IN ARGYLL KILTIES - MALE OR FEMALE- DO NOT WEAR UNDERWEAR.SPORRANS ARE WORN 'ON THE HIP' FOR DANCING AND ITS GREAT FUN WHEN SMOOCHING. NAE DRAWERS/ NAE BOXIES/ NAE SHREDDIES/ NAE NOTHING.EVER!

Michael Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2008, 09:05:07 PM »
That "no underwear" part really freaks my mom and my wife, but I go traditional, and so do my sons. Ask Harold, he "inspected" me in Estes Park. :-)

Stevie's right though, a good kilt will run upwards of $600 or more. If it's less than that, it's probably a "casual" kilt, or an off-the-rack thing that doesn't fit as well as a normal "custom" kilt. I do have a kilt like that, but it's not for formal wear.

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A. Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2008, 09:08:59 PM »
A casual kilt is more what was looking for anyways.  I don't feel really need for it to be 8-9 yards.  I have blackwatch kilts which are 5 yards and seems to cover well.  I just would have to make sure the wool is good weight.

Duke Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2008, 09:51:26 PM »
I will let you know what I think of the 13oz - I have a sample swatch that sold me on it vs the 11oz even in Florida.  I have an extra yard for a banner coming in a month and the kilt and a lad's kilt for the boy should be done a month later.  My son Taylor age six will be happy about "no underpants".

James Edward Thompson, Jr. aka Duke
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Graham Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2008, 07:24:38 PM »
I want my kilt. I need to start saving
Guess what!? I'm here to spread my words of wisdom also. Everybody fear them!!! Hahaha

Mary

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2008, 09:41:11 AM »
Many of you know that Tom and I run a Scottish clothing store and here is some information for you (before you run off and buy elsewhere...cough, cough!)

OK - NOTHING has the swing of the full 16 oz, 8 yard kilt. On the other hand, it's heavy and you might not be comfortable with the weight or you may want a lighter weigh in a hot climate. The 13 oz is the absolute minimum weight for a kilt.  11 oz is a no-no, it doesn't hold the pleating well and the pattern is smaller in the 11 oz (it's designed more for women's skirts, sashes, etc). 8 yard versus a casual or sport kilt.......well, depends on your finances, planned usage and what you want!  If you are going to wear a kilt occasionally (one or two games a year) it may not be feasible for you to sink the money into an 8 yard kilt. In that case, I would go with a casual kilt but in the 16 oz weight to give it more of the standard "look." There is very little difference in price between a 13 oz and a 16 oz.


PRICING --- you guys should be shopping with us! 
We haven't raised our prices in a number of years because our goal is to make kilts available to more people rather than to make big profits.....in fact, we lowered them about 2 years ago. We have EXACTLY the same kilt fabric and manufacturers that you are paying $600+ for from other vendors. We just aren't gouging you!

Our traditional 8 yard kilts have 3 buckles, are hand sewn with traditional fringed aprons, fully canvased and of the best tartan fabrics available. 
Our kilts are $445 - $485 for 16 oz, 8 yard, hand sewn kilt made by professional kilt makers in Glasgow, Scotland, from your choice of Lochcarron, Marton, or Strathmore fabrics. Old Edgar fabric is higher, but all the Thom(p)son tartans are available in Lochcarron fabrics and they would be MY choice.

13 oz 8 yard kilts run $445 - $465............so, not much difference!

Casual kilts - our 5 yard casual kilts are made of the same fabrics, have 3 buckles and exactly the same finish inside as the 8 yard kilts - but they are machine sewn. Prices for 16 oz tartan are $290 (up to a 46" around the 'bum' measurement) - $360 (that's for a 60" measurement around the bum.....LOTS of extra pleating!). I think the prices are competitive....you can get cheaper ones but they won't be the quality and you won't have the choice of tartan (they are offered in common, limited tartans).  Our 13 oz casual kilts are $285 - $355.

Our shipping on a kilt order is $20.

Send us an email for more info!

Mary

Michael Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2008, 10:28:27 AM »
Great message Mary, that really deals with the issue well. I do know people who have an eight yard kilt but don't wear it often because it's so hot, especially in the summer. The Highlands of Scotland as not as temperate as some of our areas in the US. Up in the mountains, it's nice though. So the casual may be more suitable for those in a warmer clime, or maybe the 8-yard in the 16 ounce. I always laugh about this because people ask me if I'm not cold in a kilt. It's actually a very warm garment.

And Aiden, it's not an issue of "coverage" that decides between an 8-yard or a casual kilt, it's usage. The 8-yard will be hand sewn with correct pleating, etc., whereas the casual one may have wider pleats and not "swing" the same way, as Mary says. If you want a kilt to wear to formal events, especially if there are real Scottish people there who know the difference, then you definitely want the 8-yard. Wearing a casual kilt to such an event would be like wearing a tee-shirt with a tuxedo printed on it to a black-tie event.

On the other hand, it you're mostly wearing it to festivals and such, the casual kilt is perfectly adequate. Just make sure it's a good quality worsted wool and made by a kiltmaker, not a seamstress. Kiltmaking is a very specialized art and even the best seamstress may not understand the issues involved.

While we're on the subject Mary, I do have a question. When I was measured for my Thompson kilt, the fellow asked if I wanted the "traditional" measurement, or to be measured where my pants ride. Wanting to be as traditional as possible, I chose that one, but I sometimes regret it now. The reason is, I have more belly than I really need, and since the traditional measurement puts the belt at the belly button, my kilt should be worn quite a bit higher than I usually wear my pants. I find that quite uncomfortable and the kilt tends to ride down to my actual waist, rather than the middle of the belly waist defined by traditional kilties.

Is the lower waistline considered gauche or uncouth at all? I have seen large bellied men with their kilts up in the proper place, but I just find it very incomfortable and hard to breathe with the belt around my middle, rather than just over my hips. Just wondered.
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A. Thompson

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2008, 11:12:15 AM »
Cool.  Definantly will take Mary's option on consideration.  However for now it might be a few months before can afford it maybe even more than half a year.  Got to many things trying to save money for and not enough money LOL


If I can I could try save enough for the 8 yard but may have to go with the 13 ounce

Here it gets hot in the summer and cold in the winter so hard to pick and choose something that works for both.  I've worn kilts in either though but not sure the weight of them.

As for wear, I'm one of the unusual people around here.  I'll wear it to festivals and such yes, but I also wear it as I would a normal pair of clothing at times.  Just instead of pulling on a pair of pants or shorts I decide to wear the kilt.  Most of what I do wearing it is casual.  They won't exactly let me wear it to work or anything lol.
« Last Edit: October 13, 2008, 11:23:03 AM by A. Thompson »

Mary

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Re: A clan kilt
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2008, 11:37:55 AM »

While we're on the subject Mary, I do have a question. When I was measured for my Thompson kilt, the fellow asked if I wanted the "traditional" measurement, or to be measured where my pants ride. Wanting to be as traditional as possible, I chose that one, but I sometimes regret it now. The reason is, I have more belly than I really need, and since the traditional measurement puts the belt at the belly button, my kilt should be worn quite a bit higher than I usually wear my pants. I find that quite uncomfortable and the kilt tends to ride down to my actual waist, rather than the middle of the belly waist defined by traditional kilties.

Is the lower waistline considered gauche or uncouth at all? I have seen large bellied men with their kilts up in the proper place, but I just find it very incomfortable and hard to breathe with the belt around my middle, rather than just over my hips. Just wondered.

Well, the traditional is the higher waistline (approximately 2" above the navel for the top of the kilt).  Tell you what --- I'll send your question on to the kilt makers in Glasgow and see what they say.....maybe they'll have an idea that could help!

Mary